Best Late Season Skiing in Europe & Resort Closing Dates

Late Season Skiing in Europe & Resort Closing Dates

Late season skiing in Europe can be among the best you’ll experience all year. Want to head out to the Alps this March, April or May? It’s more feasible than you think. How about June or July? Not a problem! Whether you’re looking to grab some late powder or hit a summer glacier, we’ve got it covered.

When does the ski season end in Europe? We’ll take you through resort by resort and explain which is best for your late season trip. Stick with us and we’ll show you the way…

Want a quick answer to your question? Here’s a handy shortcut for you:

When Does the Ski Season End in Europe?

On average, ski resorts in the Alps close between middle and late April though this will vary greatly depending on their location and expected snow coverage. Some ski resorts will remain open year round, though we’ll cover these in depth further on.

Here’s a list of the ski resort closing dates for France, Switzerland, Austria and Italy:

French Ski Resort
Closing Dates 2018
Swiss Ski Resorts
Closing Dates 2018
Austrian Ski Resorts
Closing Dates 2018
Italian Ski Resorts
Closing Dates 2018
Alpe D'Huez
(21st April)
Adelboden
(6th May)
Alpbach
(8th April)
Alpe Cermis- Cavalese
(8th April)
Alpe du Grand Serre
(2nd April)
Aletsch Arena
(14th April)
Arraba
(Mid April)
Alpe di Paglio
(17th April)
Auris en Oisans
(15th April)
Andermatt
(31st May)
Bad Gastein - Graukogel
(2nd April)
Alpe di Siusi
(8th April)
Autrans
(31st March)
Anzere
(15th April)
Bad Gastein - Sportgastein
(15th April)
Alta Badia
(8th April)
Avoriaz
(22nd April)
Arosa
(15th April)
Ellmau
(8th April)
Aprica
(2nd April)
Besse
(15th April)
Axalp
(2nd April)
Flachau
(8th April)
Arabba
(8th April)
Brides les Bains
(13th April)
Buerchen-Toerbe
(2nd April)
Fügen
(8th April)
Bardonecchia
(8th April)
Chamonix
(1st May)
Champéry
(15th April)
Galtür - Silvretta
(15th April)
Bormio
(8th April)
Champagny en Vanoise
(22nd April)
Château-d’Oex
(25th March)
Hintertux
(Open all year)
Campitello
(8th April)
Chamrousse
(22nd April)
Chur
(25th March)
Ischgl
(1st May)
Canazei
(8th April)
Châtel
(22nd April)
Corvatsch – Sils – Silvaplana
(6th May)
Kappl
(8th April)
Cervinia
(6th May)
Combloux
(25th March)
Crans Montana
(22nd April)
Kitzbühel
(6th May)
Champoluc
(8th April)
Corrençon en Vercors
(2nd April)
Davos
(15th April)
Lech Zurs am Alberg
(22nd April)
Claviere
(8th April)
Courchevel
(15th April)
Eischoll
(18th March)
Mayrhofen
(15th April)
Cortina d'Ampezzo
(1st May)
Crest Voland Cohennoz
(13th April)
Gstaad
(6th May)
Obergurgl
(22nd April)
Courmayeur
(8th April)
Flaine
(20th April)
Kandersteg
(25th March)
Saalbach-Hinterglemm
(8th April)
Dolomiti Superski
(8th April)
Flumet
(8th April)
La Tzoumaz
(22nd April)
Serfaus and Fiss-Ladis
(15th April)
Folgarida-Marillev
(8th April)
Gresse-en-Vercors
(18th March)
Laax
(8th April)
Sölden
(6th May)
Gressoney La Trinité
(15th April)
La Clusaz
(28th April)
Les Pleiades
(18th March)
Soll
(8th April)
Gressoney Saint Jean
(26th March)
La Grave
(29th April)
Lenzerheide
(Mid April)
St Anton am Alberg
(22nd April)
La Thuile
(15th April)
La Joue du Loup
(13th April)
Les Crosets
(15th April)
St. Johann in Tirol
(2nd April)
Livigno
(1st May)
La Plagne
(28th April)
Les Diablerets
(15th April)
St. Jakob
(8th April)
Madonna di Campiglio
(15th April)
La Rosière
(20th April)
Leukerbad
(30th April)
Zell am See - Kaprun
(22nd July)
Marilleva- Folgarida
(8th April)
La Tania
(15th April)
Leysin- Les Mosses
(31st March)
Zell am See – Schmittenhöhe
(8th April)
Obereggen
(8th April)
Lans en Vercors
(2nd April)
Morgins
(8th April)
Zillertal Arena
(15th April)
Passo del Tonale
(Mid June)
Le Collet d'Allevard
(8th April)
Mürren – Schilthorn
(22nd April)
Pila
(15th April)
Le Grand-Bornand
(20th April)
Nendaz
(23rd April)
Pinzolo
(2nd April)
Les 7 Laux
(2nd April)
Neuchâtel (La Robella and Bugenenets)
(2nd April)
Plan de Corones
(22nd April)
Les Arcs
(28th April)
Ovronnaz
(8th April)
Pontedilegno-Tonale (Adamello Ski area)
(1st May)
Les Contamines-Montjoie
(22nd April)
Saanen
(25th March)
Pozza-di-Fassa
(8th April)
Les Carroz
(20th April)
Saas-Fee
(22nd April)
San Vigilio di Marebbe
(23rd April)
Les 2 Alpes
(28th April)
St Moritz
(6th May)
Sappada
(2nd April)
Les Gets
(15th April)
Unterbach
(2nd April)
Sauze D'Oulx
(8th April)
Les Houches
(15th April)
Verbier
(22nd April)
Sestriere
(8th April)
Les Menuires
(27th April)
Veysonnaz
(29th April)
Val di Fassa
(2nd-8th April)
Les Saisies
(27th April)
Villars/Gryon
(15th April)
Val Gardena
(8th April)
Megeve
(15th April)
Wengen
(15th April)
Valchiavenna
(8th April)
Meribel
(22nd April)
Zermatt
(30th September)
Montchavin Les Coches
(22nd April)
Montgenèvre
(28th April)
Morzine
(15th April)
Notre Dame de Bellecombe
(6th April)
Oz en Oisans
(20th April)
Peisey-Vallandry
(28th April)
Praz sur Arly
(6th April)
Puy Saint Vincent
(8th April)
Sainte-Foy-Tarentaise
(14th April)
Saint Jean de Sixt
(18th March)
Saint Martin de Belleville
(27th April)
Samoens
(20th April)
Serre Chevalier
(22nd April)
Sestriere
(8th April)
Saint Gervais
(15th April)
Tignes
(6th May)
Val Cenis
(20th April)
Val d’Isère
(1st May)
Val Thorens
(8th May)
Valmorel
(15th April)
Villard de Lans
(9th April)
Villard Reculas
(15th April)

Best Late Season Skiing Snow Conditions in Europe

Generally speaking, the best late season snow conditions in Europe are seen in resorts situated 2500m or higher. It’s also recommended to look for a resort which is north facing. Here are some of the best resorts for late season snow.

Sölden, Austria

Sölden is a ski resort which is quickly gathering momentum. More and more skiers are finding their way to this Austrian gem and sharing its beauty with their friends and fellow powder addicts.

By March/April, Sölden’s lower runs are getting a little sludgy but don’t let that fool you. The resort boasts a varied selection of exciting high altitude runs which will keep you entertained late in the season.

The snow reliability is giving Sölden a great reputation for itself, and skiers can always rely on its two glaciers, the Rettenbach and Tiefenbach, if conditions are looking poor.

Sölden Fact File

Altitude: 1350m – 3340m
Km of pistes: 144km
Longest run: 15km
Best for: Intermediate skiers
Lifts: 31

Ischgl, Austria

Ischgl is home to some of the highest altitude terrain in Austria. Its runs are actually some of the most reliable among all non-glacier resorts. This is mostly due to the snow preservation and cannons as opposed to its snowfall amount.

The resort is most recognised for its lively après-ski and its even livelier gigs. But don’t let this fool you, Ischgl isn’t just a one-hit wonder. The resort’s 238km pistes are exciting and varied. If you’re hitting the slopes late, this is a genuine option for you to consider, especially if you love a party.

Ischgl Fact File

Altitude: 1377m – 2872m
Km of pistes: 238km
Longest run: 11km
Best for: Après-ski
Lifts: 45

Obergurgl, Austria

Obergurgl has a long season of snow reliability making it a favourite for late visitors. It’s not a glacier resort but don’t let that fool you, you’re unlikely to be disappointed here.

The resort is pretty high with the majority of slopes north-facing. In case you’re still concerned, the resort claims to offer 100% artificial snow coverage. Try not to get caught in bad weather here though, the open slopes and few trees will make life pretty uncomfortable.

Obergurgl Fact File

Altitude: 1793m – 3082m
Km of pistes: 110km
Longest run: 8km
Best for: Intermediate skiers
Lifts: 24

Val Thorens, France

Val Thorens has to be one of the best ski resorts out there… come on, what more could you want from a resort?

Part of the Three Valleys, Val Thorens is French ski royalty. It’s the highest ski resort in Europe, with two glaciers and some pretty impressive snow making facilities. There are slopes here to complement any type of skier, from beginners to seasoned experts.

The resort is another snow-sure heavyweight with reliable conditions all the way through into May.

Val Thorens Fact File

Altitude: 2300m – 3230m
Km of pistes: 150km
Longest run: 4km
Best for: All rounder
Lifts: 32

Val d’Isere, France

It would be a tough mission to leave Val d’Isere disappointed – especially when you’re in need of a late season skiing destination. With a wide range of terrain and snow-sure slopes, Val d’Isere is visited by a loyal following of skiers year after year.

Part of the wider ski area L’Espace Killy, which joins Val d’Isere and Tignes, the resort is home to 300km of top quality high-altitude skiing in Europe.

The resort’s popularity means it’s constantly being updated, and is home to a seriously impressive lift system. You won’t be waiting around in a lift queue for too long! Besides, lifts are always quieter in Spring.

Val d’Isere Fact File

Altitude: 1850m –3456m
Km of pistes: 146km
Longest run: 10km
Best for: High altitude skiing
Lifts: 42

Tignes, France

The second half of L’Espace Killy ski area, Tignes can also boast high-altitude skiing. With many of its slopes above 2500m, it’s easy to see why the resort is so widely commended for snow reliability.

Both resorts are so close to the Italian border, they often enjoy snow from the South-East. The area also benefits from some stunning glaciers which are always a good place to head when conditions aren’t desirable.

Tignes Fact File

Altitude: 1550m – 3450m
Km of pistes: 150km
Longest run: 5km
Best for: Having something for everyone
Lifts: 42

Hintertux, Austria

The glacier at Hintertux is quite possibly one of the best in the Alps. Many have suggested it’s actually the most snow-sure resort in the whole of Europe, we’ll leave that one to you guys to argue about. It’s certainly up there among the top.

The resort itself can get a little quiet in the evenings which can be a little frustrating for some. It’s also worth noting that the slopes can get very crowded when other nearby resorts are suffering from poor conditions.

Hintertux Fact File

Altitude: 1500m – 3250m
Km of pistes: 60km
Longest run: 12km
Best for: Glacier skiing
Lifts: 21

Hintertux Late Season Snow Conditions

Zermatt, Switzerland

So, let’s get it out the way, Zermatt certainly isn’t for everyone – it’s a ski resort better suited for the more affluent. Having said that, if you’re keen to make the journey to this resort, you’ll find it open far late into the season.

The village is exceptionally high, with enticing runs which are guaranteed to offer something to feed your adrenaline fix. The glacier is also key to the allure of the resort during the Spring months.

Zermatt Fact File

Altitude: 1620m – 3899m
Km of pistes: 360km
Longest run: 25km
Best for: Views of the Matterhorn
Lifts: 52

Cervinia, Italy

Zermatt’s less attractive neighbour, Cervinia is a more accessible option for late season skiers. Despite sharing the mountain, the two resorts vary hugely.

Cervinia may not have the postcard-pretty appearance found in Zermatt, but it appeals more to families and those on a budget.

With gentle terrain, the resort is perfect for unsure beginners and those who are lacking in confidence. Due to its high-altitude, you’ll find Cervinia open late into the season.

Cervinia Fact File

Altitude: 2050m –3480m
Km of pistes: 107m
Longest run: 20km
Best for: Easy terrain
Lifts: 13

St. Moritz, Switzerland

St. Moritz might attract a few more ‘high-end’ visitors, but this isn’t all it has to offer.

While skiing in Switzerland is famous for its price tag, St. Moritz’s reliable snow cover makes for a great holiday.

If you can look past the glitz and glamour, the enormous selection of winter sports is hugely tempting. There’s everything from bob sledding to ice skating!

St. Moritz Fact File

Altitude: 1731m – 3303m
Km of pistes: 350km
Longest run: 10km
Best for: All-round winter sports
Lifts: 56

Chamonix, France

Renowned for the challenge it presents to even the best skiers, Chamonix can rely on a good cover of snow.

Despite being home to some difficult slopes, Chamonix has a varied range of pistes. If you don’t fancy the tougher pistes, you’ll find plenty for beginner and intermediate levels. It’s not all about adrenaline-junkies!

The town might be a quiet one with irregular buses, but the upside is quieter slopes.

For late-season skiing, Chamonix has a lot to offer. The glacier runs are often at their best later on in the season!

Chamonix Fact File

Altitude: 1042m – 3275m
Km of pistes: 140km
Longest run: 19km
Best for: Versatile pistes
Lifts: 47

Charmonix Late Season Skiing

Kitzbühel, Austria

If you asked a group of keen skiers what springs to mind when they think about Kitzbühel, most would likely answer the Hahnenkamm. The Hahnenkamm is the most terrifying downhill race in the World Cup circuit.

But, this reputation is slightly misguided! Kitzbühel is home to plenty of gentle terrain, better suited to beginners and intermediates.

The resort is hugely popular with skiers all year-round, largely thanks to its snow-sure slopes.

Kitzbühel Fact File

Altitude: 800m – 2000m
Km of pistes: 170m
Longest run: 8km
Best for: Intermediate terrain
Lifts: 56

Corvatsch – Sils – Silvaplana, Switzerland

Corvatsch – Sils – Silvaplana is one of the less famous resorts in the Alps. But, it’s known for being a highly snow-sure resort!

With some breath-taking mountain scenery and plenty of lakes, the views shouldn’t disappoint either.

Corvatsch – Sils – Silvaplana is home to plenty of activities to suit the more adventurous. It’s even home to Switzerland’s longest night slope!

Corvatsch – Sils – Silvaplana Fact File

Altitude: 1870m –3303m
Km of pistes: 120m
Longest run: 9km
Best for: Varied slopes
Lifts: 14

Zell am See, Austria

If you can’t make up your mind about when to go skiing you’re in luck. Zell am See is famous for its almost never-ending seasons, keeping its slopes open until the summer.

With a glacier nearby in Kaprun, it’s clear why the resort can boast about its snow reliability.

But, there’s more on offer than snowy mountains! A resort wouldn’t stay open so late for no reason, right? There’s plenty to do on and off the slopes, with varied terrain and plenty of other winter sport activities.

Zell am See Fact File

Altitude: 750m –3029m
Km of pistes: 138km
Longest run: 8km
Best for: Year-round skiing
Lifts: 46

Best Places to Ski in March & April

So, where to ski in March and April? There’s plenty of choice out there for the late season skiers among you… you just need to know where to look. By the end of these months, most ski resorts will be coming to the end of their season. Though, you can still find some awesome pistes in peak condition. Be sure to aim for resorts with lifts networked above 1800m. Here’s our pick of the best spots.

Skiing in France in March & April

The best snow in March and April is usually found in the resorts with the highest peaks. Thankfully for those who love a trip to the French Alps, there are plenty of resorts above the all-important 2500m mark.

Skiing in France at the end of the season is still as fun as it would be in December or January as long as you know where to look. Heading to the country during this time will likely offer you the benefit of cheaper transfer and rental prices – who doesn’t love an off-peak bargain? Besides, the money you saved in travelling off-peak can be spent on the all-important après which is always more enjoyable in the sun.

Skiing in Austria in March & April

Wide open pistes, late snowfall and north-facing slopes help to make Austria a worthy destination to head late in the season. It may be a controversial topic but you some resorts even bring out the artificial snow cannons to ensure full coverage late into the season.

Resorts like Obergurgl, Ischgl, Lech and Obertauern will ensure you can sneak in one last trip before packing your skis away for the next six months.

Skiing in Austria in March and April

Skiing in Switzerland in March & April

Skiing in Switzerland in March and April doesn’t have to be a let-down. If there’s snow, it’s not too late. Again, opt for the higher altitude resorts with the long seasons.

Zermatt is naturally the obvious answer in this debate for its lofty altitude and sweet glaciers. Unfortunately, it’s far removed from the more affordable resorts. Saas Fee could be a more approachable option, as is Verbier.

Skiing in Italy in March & April

Unfortunately for those in love with the charm of Italian skiing, the country is falling behind in the late season skiing race. The resorts aren’t quite at the altitude of its other Alpine neighbours meaning its seasons tend to finish earlier.

Having said this, there is still hope. A handful of resorts keeping holding strong late into the year. Cervinia’s exceptionally high altitude makes it an ideal spot all the way into May. Livigno is another reliable option for those of you who are late to the party. Alternatively, La Thuile, Passo Tonale and Champoluc are all worth a look.

Easter Ski Holidays in the Alps- Advice and Guidance

We’ll never quite understand why the Easter holiday date changes every year. All you ever seem to know is it’ll be around April-time.

But, for those wondering, this year’s Easter falls between Good Friday on March 30th until Easter Monday on 2nd April. It’s an early one!

The confusion surrounding when exactly Easter is can make it difficult to plan your ski holiday. Not only this, but heading to the slopes in the holidays can be a challenge in itself. To help you get around this, here are some top tips for Easter skiing.

Best Time to Book

If you’ve ever tried to go skiing in the Easter holidays, you may have encountered the challenge of booking. No one wants to see the words ‘fully-booked’!

Fear not! You and your young travellers can still make it to the slopes.

To make sure your Easter holidays aren’t ruined, the best tip is to book early. While some people might be organised enough to book during summer, this doesn’t help the rest of us.

Plus, isn’t summer a little early to be thinking about skiing? The early bird might catch the worm, but there’s a line.

For Easter ski holidays, the best time to book is January. So… bet get booking now, you’re falling behind!!!

We should point out, though, the most snow-sure resorts will get full quicker. So, beware – you may face disappointment if you’re thinking of heading to high-altitudes.

Be on the look-out for any deals! While Easter is a popular time for skiing, there are ways to save money on your holiday.

Easter Ski Resorts

Great news! An early Easter means most ski resorts will still be open.

But, if you’re anything like us, this information just isn’t good enough. So, we thought we’d take a look at the most snow-sure resorts for spring skiing.

  • Tignes, France
  • Val d’Isere, France
  • St Anton, Austria
  • Val Thorens, France
  • Zermatt, Austria
  • Hintertux, Austria
  • Les 2 Alpes, France
  • Solden, Austria
  • Lech, Austria

Best Resorts for Family Easter Ski Holidays

If you’re heading to the slopes this Easter, you’ll have to plan around the kids.

While every ski resort has a lot to offer all members of the family, it’s hard to know where to ski at Easter.

Avoriaz, France

Avoriaz is well-loved by families’ year after year. This year, it’s staying open until the 22nd April! While the pistes can get busy in Spring, there are plenty of nursey slopes to keep small travellers happy.

Obergurgl, Austria

One of the highest ski resorts in Europe, Obergurgl will also keep its ‘doors’ open until April 22nd. Snow-sure with a child-friendly atmosphere, the resort can boast good Easter skiing.

Wengen, Switzerland

Experience Wengen’s infectious and playful charm until the 15th April! With a nursery slope in the centre of the village, Wengen is well-equipped to cope with floods of young travellers on their Easter ski holidays.

Pila, Italy

This purpose-built resort has plenty on offer for the smaller slope-lovers until April 15th! For any adults who want to venture off-piste, there’s even two tailor-made ‘Mini Clubs’ for children aged 3-12.

Pila, Italy - Late Season Skiing

Lech, Austria

All kids love snow, right? Lech promises to have some of the best Easter snow conditions, staying open until April 22nd. There’s plenty of easy beginner slopes for kids to get their teeth into! Plus, many more difficult options for adults looking to show off.

All Year-Round Skiing

What about ski resorts open all year?

Believe it or not, there are some places where the ski season never has to end!

So, whether you fancy going skiing more than once, or you’re looking for sun as well as snow, there’s lots of opportunity for year-round skiing. You just have to know where to look!

Summer Ski Resorts

If you’re a fan of swapping beach towels for skis, you’re in luck. High-altitude glacier resorts can boast summer skiing.

Remember – you’ll have to go high! At least 2,500m is recommended.

Where to Ski in Summer?

Tempted by some summer snow? Here are a few of our top picks for summer skiing in Europe:

  • Les 2 Alpes, France
  • Hintertux, Austria
  • Tignes, France
  • Andermatt, Switzerland
  • Zermatt, Switzerland
  • Kaprun, Austria
  • Saas Fee, Switzerland
  • Cervinia, Italy
  • Passo del Tonale, Italy

Are Ski Resorts Cheaper in Summer?

You should find flights to your chosen resort much cheaper than in winter.

Winter is the peak-time for skiing! Airlines will expect most of their customers to head to warmer destinations. But, Benidorm isn’t for you this year, so you’re in luck.

Prices for lift passes will remain around the same as in winter. But, you’ll often have the option for a ‘visitor pass’, which includes ski lifts, as well as plenty of other summer activities.

Les Deux Alpes - Easter Skiing

Can You Go Off-Piste in Summer?

In summer, you may find your off-piste options limited. Sorry to the more adventurous skiers, but a lack of fresh snowfall will hinder your taste for danger.

What Time Do the Slopes Close?

In certain resorts, you may find the days to be a bit shorter due to warmer weather.
For summer skiing holidays, the best advice is to get there early!

The slopes open in the morning around 7am, and close just after lunch at around 2-3pm.

What About Summer Activities?

As the day gets later, you may find your skiing options limited. Fear not! There are a whole host of other activities to keep you entertained on your summer skiing holiday.

Fancy going mountain biking? Ever been cave jumping?

From the Les Arcs bike trail in Mont Blanc to mountaineering in Italy, the Alps has a lot to offer its summer visitors.

Are the Slopes Quieter?

The later into the season you go, the quieter you’ll find the slopes!

Most keen skiers will have had their fix in the earlier months. So, you’ll find plenty of open pistes in front of you!

Ski Resorts Open All Year-Round

On the hunt for year-round ski resorts? Look no further!

If you need your fix of pistes and après-ski all year round, there are some options for you.
In these resorts, you’ll find a 365-day ski season:

  • Hintertux
  • Zermatt
  • Kaprun

Getting to Your Resort

Don’t settle for paying more than you need for your airport transfer. Many operators offer off-peak discounts – with the exception of Easter weekend. Thankfully, with Ski Transfer Finder, you can compare different transfer operators and choose whichever price or provider you’d prefer to use.

All our transfer providers are verified, fully licensed and covered by our money back guarantee. There are no hidden fees, what you see is what you get. Find the cheapest airport transfer for your late season ski trip here.